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Coming back to me The Autobiography

Riends and colleagues could have foreseen On Saturday February 25 2006 four days before leading England into the first Test against India in place of the injured captain Vaughan Trescothick was out for 32 in the second innings of the final warm up match As he walked from the field he fought to calm the emotional storm that was raging inside him at least to hide it from prying eyes In the dressing room he broke down in tears overwhelmed by a blur of anguish uncertainty and sadness he had been keeping at bay for longer than he knew Within hours England's best batsman was on the next flight home His departure was kept secret until after close of play when coach Duncan Fletcher told the stunned media his acti. I can vaguely remember this being considered a good book on its release but that was well before I read so much and so was never really on my radar nor is it still considered a must read really As much as anything it reveals how mental illness was seen 12 years ago long before TV campaigns about itThe early stuff is standard sports autobiography fare child very good at sport does much better than his peers and when playing for his county and his country the anecdotes get better I still found it difficult to read his personality settled fairly young but also one of the senior banter merchants of the side yet rarely coming across as that laddish Perhaps the theme of the book doesn t lend itself to japes but to be honest I didn t find out what interested him beyond his family and batting euipment which was a slight shame in such a personal bookHis depression takes up a significant part of the book and he and his ghostwriter do seem to convey how it felt to him in a way that other writers haven t managed to the same extent It s difficult to know whether some of the underlying reasons were a touch speculative such as strong characters suffering because weaker ones let problems go or whether they were attempts by psychiatrists to boost his self esteem Although some of the forensic details of press days could get a bit wearing I do admit that the smaller details allowed the reader to get a much less vague idea of how his mind was affected which I appreciated It s also amazing what tricks reporters get up to even when you know in the abstract tabloid hacks are a joke the specifics are disgracefulPerhaps the attitude to mental illness has changed a touch since 2008 as I doubt a book solely on depression would have been commissioned back then whereas now I could imagine the cricket being sidelined But there is still a sense of public support and private admonishment that has stayed until today although now depression seems to be considered in its own right whereas Trescothick s seems to have a concrete causeI did find some of the insight into training interesting too and Vaughan comes out of this especially well which surprised me as I find him really annoying but it seems as a captain he was uite a dynamic character and Fletcher also gave something new to the side But on the field it became abstract or lists of scores the behind the scenes angle was much revealing both of his illness and his teammates

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Ng captain had uit the tour for personal family reasons Until now the full extraordinary story of what happened that day and why of what preceded his breakdown has never been told He reveals for the first time that he almost flew home from the 2004 tour to South Africa what caused it  and what followed his comeback to the England side and a second crushing breakdown nine months later that left him unable to continue the 2006–2007 Ashes tour down under 'Coming Back to Me' will replace the myths and rumors with the truth as Trescothick talks with engaging openness and enthusiasm about his rise to the top of international cricket; and describes with eual frankness his tortured descent into private despair. In so many ways this is such a courageous and honest account of an illness that is still even now so difficult to admit to having suffered Marcus Trescothick was a brilliant dashing opening batsman part of the legendary 2005 England Ashes team He rode the crest of a hugely successful sporting wave and then mental illness struck And for the most part this book is a candid and sensitive account of that illness and how difficult it was for a sportsman in his position to acknowledge it But acknowledge it he does And then he or Peter Hayter his ghost writer goes and spoils it all by uttering such a crassness as in any case they his England team mates must ve been pretty uncertain as to the prescribed form of mickey taking for someone who had spent the last three months barking at the moon Barking at the moon Trescothick had what he himself describes as a physical illness one he found almost impossible to come to terms with in no small part due to the stigma that such mickey taking creates It s simply not funny It s laddish and boorish and all the things that made it so hard for him a professional sportsman to deal with it in the first place The bants the jokes the fooling around Trescothick wants his cake and wants to eat it Charlie Williams once used to tell racist jokes Against himself That would be utterly unacceptable now And so should this especially from someone who should know better But then again the bants is so much a part of all male sporting culture that it s easy to see why Trescothick might both want to dish it out as well as take it That s not to excuse any of it Far from it For as the author hints elsewhere that is part of the problem The pressure the taunts names and shame that s conseuently associated with any perceived deviation from the toxic male norm the herd mentality the line of least resistance that inevitably leads to laughing at things you might not find funny because it s bants isn t it Harmless bants Well it s not harmless and it s still a long slow process getting young men who are let s remember statistically most vulnerable to suicide to resist such laddish behaviour And I m afraid examples like this from a man who should know so much better don t help The Illusionists uit the tour for personal family reasons Until now the full extraordinary story of what happened that day and why of what preceded his breakdown has never been told He reveals for the first time that he almost flew home from the 2004 tour to South Africa what caused it  and what followed his comeback to the England side and a second crushing breakdown nine months later that left him Planet of the Bugs unable to continue the 2006–2007 Ashes tour down Fishes of the Open Ocean under 'Coming Back to Me' will replace the myths and rumors with the truth as Trescothick talks with engaging openness and enthusiasm about his rise to the top of international cricket; and describes with eual frankness his tortured descent into private despair. In so many ways this is such a courageous and honest account of an illness that is still even now so difficult to admit to having suffered Marcus Trescothick was a brilliant dashing opening batsman part of the legendary 2005 England Ashes team He rode the crest of a hugely successful sporting wave and then mental illness struck And for the most part this book is a candid and sensitive account of that illness and how difficult it was for a sportsman in his position to acknowledge it But acknowledge it he does And then he or Peter Hayter his ghost writer goes and spoils it all by Out of Bounds (Boundaries, uttering such a crassness as in any case they his England team mates must ve been pretty Grass, Sky, Song uncertain as to the prescribed form of mickey taking for someone who had spent the last three months barking at the moon Barking at the moon Trescothick had what he himself describes as a physical illness one he found almost impossible to come to terms with in no small part due to the stigma that such mickey taking creates It s simply not funny It s laddish and boorish and all the things that made it so hard for him a professional sportsman to deal with it in the first place The bants the jokes the fooling around Trescothick wants his cake and wants to eat it Charlie Williams once Otter Chaos! (Otter Chaos used to tell racist jokes Against himself That would be The Illusionists utterly O Último Testamento (Maggie Costello, unacceptable now And so should this especially from someone who should know better But then again the bants is so much a part of all male sporting culture that it s easy to see why Trescothick might both want to dish it out as well as take it That s not to excuse any of it Far from it For as the author hints elsewhere that is part of the problem The pressure the taunts names and shame that s conseuently associated with any perceived deviation from the toxic male norm the herd mentality the line of least resistance that inevitably leads to laughing at things you might not find funny because it s bants isn t it Harmless bants Well it s not harmless and it s still a long slow process getting young men who are let s remember statistically most vulnerable to suicide to resist such laddish behaviour And I m afraid examples like this from a man who should know so much better don t help

Marcus Trescothick ✓ 6 CHARACTERS

In this true life sporting memoir of one of the best batsman in the game who stunned the cricket world when he prematurely ended his own England career Trescothick’s brave and soul baring account of his mental frailties opens the way to a better understanding of the uniue pressures experienced by modern day professional sportsmen At 29 Marcus Trescothick was widely regarded as one of the batting greats With than 5000 Test runs to his name and a 2005 Ashes hero some were predicting this gentle West Country cricket nut might even surpass Graham Gooch's record to become England's highest ever Test run scorer But the next time Trescothick hit the headlines it was for reasons no one but a handful of close f. This is much than another sports book Marcus Trescothick is not one of those here today and gone tomorrow cricketers who have to get their story out after they have been in the game for a very short time He is an honest to goodness chap who wanted to tell his life story which entailed a major breakdown that ultimately spelt the end of his international cricketing careerHe begins at the end Surprised No need to be for he felt that the best way to deal with his demons was to get them out up front for the reader so heshe would know what they were in for And it works splendidlyAfter painfully outlining his problems he returns to his roots and tells of his upbringing and how he became the cricketer that he turned out to be And he was no ordinary player his talent soon shone through and he was recognised as England potentialHis performances were such that he played for his country as a junior before being elevated to the senior ranks and eventually captaining his country in two Test Matches He married had a daughter he now has two and went touring with the England team It was while he was away that he realised he could not continue this life style even though as he acknowledges he was at the top of his profession and earning very good money In a harrowing tale he tells how his demons surfaced and how he and his family dealt with them And he willingly acknowledges the part his wife in particular and his family helped him overcome themHe continued to play county cricket and to score runs mercilessly and he returned to the England set up But after being a member of the hugely successful 2005 Ashes winning side his demons surfaced once again and he was back to suare one And once again his family pulled him throughThe book is not only a sporting autobiography but a shining example of how to fight and manage I deliberately hesitate to use the verb overcome as I know to my own cost this depressive illness and as such it is a compelling readNot surprisingly Coming back to me won the William Hill Sports Book Award for 2008 but I stress it is much than a sports book


10 thoughts on “Coming back to me The Autobiography

  1. says:

    This is much than another sports book Marcus Trescothick is not one of those here today and gone tomorrow cricketers who hav

  2. says:

    Marcus Trescothick was one of the truly great English Batsmen until his depression was severely triggered and he realised that touring overseas was an impossibility Very candid and very open from a wonderful pla

  3. says:

    The second half which concentrates on his depression is much interesting than the first which tends to fall into the trap of many sports' biogs we started the day on 280 4 Pakistan set us a tough target etcBut his

  4. says:

    Much than a sporting autobiography a painful look at Marc's descent into mental illness and his struggle to contain the demo

  5. says:

    Entertaining in some parts moving in other parts interesting in all parts

  6. says:

    I can vaguely remember this being considered a good book on its release but that was well before I read so much and so was never really on my radar nor is it still considered a must read really As much as anything it reveals how mental illness was seen 12 years ago long before TV campaigns about itThe early stuff is standa

  7. says:

    In so many ways this is such a courageous and honest account of an illness that is still even now so difficult to admit to having suffered Marcus Trescothick was a brilliant dashing opening batsman part of the legendary 2005 England Ashes team He rode the crest of a hugely successful sporting wave and then mental illness struck An

  8. says:

    No matter how assiduous the human efforts events inevitably take their own course Be it over the course of an innings a match an entire career or life in general Marcus Trescothick's autobiography is a gripping read as it charts out his rise through the ranks before diving deep into his 'stress related illness' something which still carries

  9. says:

    I purposefully avoid rating a book where the focus is on the author's personal battle with depression in professional sportApart from the chapters on his dark days and family census the rest of the book is an average read for people who have followed the sport passionately in the early 2000s There is scope for personalities to come in from

  10. says:

    Its a pretty good book I found myself getting frustrating reading it every time Trescothick had another bout of d

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